Uncategorized

Home/Uncategorized

Covid19 Is In This Town, Lyrics

This song is to the original The Other Side, from the film The Greatest Showman. The video will be posted below ours.

Lucy was supposed to perform music from this movie for her choir concert that was cancelled. It seemed appropriate to make another music video. She wrote all the lyrics herself.

And so we present to you…the Jones’ Public Service Announcement. A music video in which rebellious mom wants to go outside but her daughter won’t allow such dangerous behavior.

Will mom get out? Or will the daughter win the day and convince her to stay inside?

You’ll have to watch to find out (apologies that the mother in this video cannot sing to save her life. Let me suggest you listen to the daughter).

The lyrics are below so you can sing along.

 

Lyrics:

Right here, right now

You need to hear me out

Don’t want to chase you down

I need to warn you

You stay at home

Even though you’ll be alone

Into your walls you really need to stay in

Don’t be rebellious its really for the best

And if you’re hungry eat a bunch of candy

You can play it sensible, get TP and canned beans

Or you can risk it all and see.

 

Don’t you dare to go outside

And stay away from everyone in sight

The disease is in the air and its starting to spread around

Covid19 is in this town

Cause you can go and get sick

Or you can be healthy

Stock up on food and wash for 20 seconds

Oh yeah you can’t keep going around

Covid19 is in this town

 

Okay my friend you wanna keep me in

Well I hate to tell you, but it just won’t happen

I can’t stay at home

I gotta go outside

I’ll just go mad in the house I stay in

I’ll use handsoap and even wear a mask

But I’m not going to stay

not eve-en o-one day

Wha-at will I do     if I’m stuck with you

No way that it’ll ever be

 

I’ve got gotta go outside

And I talk to everyone in sight

Though corona’s in the air I just can’t be alone

I really cannot stay at home

You can be alone

I’m gonna go free

Not gonna stay if I know I won’t be happy

Oh yeah I’m gonna walk around

I really cannot stay at home

 

Now is this how you’d like to spend your days

TV and misery, video games

 

If I let myself loose it’ll probably be bad

I’d get the disease and have to breathe from a bag

 

But you would finally live a little, finally laugh a little

Just let me give you the freedom to dream

 

But it’ll make you cough and cause your AKING

Don’t wanna help the virus in spreading

Not a disease that seems worth getting

But I guess I’ll leave that up to you

 

Well its intriguing but to stay would be so boring

What are some things I could do with my time wisely

 

Fair enough you’ll want a little bit of action

It’s a really good time to work on fractions

 

That’s school, that’s boring. I’d like something fun to do

 

Why not just go ahead and try an instrument or two

 

Puzzles?

 

I’d do crafts.

 

Baking

 

Legos

 

Fun!

 

Don’t you dare to go outside

And stay away from everyone in sight

The disease is in the air and its starting to spread around

Covid19 is in this town

Cause you can go and get sick

Or you can be healthy

Stock up on food and wash for 20 seconds

Oh yeah you can’t keep going around

Covid19 is in this town

 

So you can go and get sick

Covid 19 is in this town

 

Or you can be healthy

You’ve convinced me to stay home

 

Don’t cough or sneeze

At Any single time

 

Covid 19 is in this town

 

 

And the original

We’re Not Gonna Get It. The Lyrics.

Just in case you want to sing along with our version of Twisted Sister’s We’re Not Gonna Take It, here are the lyrics.

Also, the original music video is totally worth watching. We didn’t master the makeup but I think we did the hair pretty well.

Here is the Joneses’ version and down below I’ll paste the original Twisted Sister version.

We’re Not Gonna Get It (by the Joneses, aka Twisted Sister in a Time of Coronavirus)

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

We’ve got hand sanitizer

We wash for 20 seconds

This is our life. We’re stuck at home.

 

I’ll do the online school, fine

Don’t judge my video game time

Where are my friends? I’m all alone

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

Oh I’m so bored and antsy

There’s no point in dressing fancy

The school is shut, no work to do.

 

My life is stuck with these two

Pray that I will make it through

We’ve got TP and we’ve got canned food

 

 

Corona

Corona

 

We’re stuck (in Djibouti!)

We’re home (alone)

With luck (yeah)

We’re healthy (for now!)

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

Insha allah!

 

(music)

 

Corona

Corona

 

We’re stuck (in Djibouti!)

We’re home (alone)

With luck (yeah)

We’re healthy (for now!)

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

Just you try to infect us

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

Come on! You’re all coughing and sick

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

 

We’re not gonna get it

No! We ain’t gonna get it

We’re not gonna get COVID19

 

Don’t try to cough on me…

(we hope!)

 

 

And the original.

New Hymn Ideas Like, “Tender Mother Hen”

A question:

Why don’t we ever sing songs about God, our Tender Mother Hen? (Luke 13:34)

I heard a song a few months ago that was about going out and bringing home the head of my enemy. I know the “enemy” was sin. I get it. But it wasn’t an image that inspired worship. At least, it didn’t inspire worship in that moment. Maybe it is just me, but the image of myself holding a bloody head, separated from its body, while useful in appreciating how serious I should take the fight against sin, wasn’t one I wanted to summon while singing in church.

So I wondered if we could have some songs with different kinds of imagery? This made me consider various passage of scripture that present God in unconventional ways. By unconventional, I mean ways in which God is not commonly thought about in our current culture. I do know that there are some lovely songs out there. Just making suggestions for more.

Maybe a song-writer would like to write a song about God, our tender mother hen.

Or God, Glorious in Breastfeeding? (Isaiah 49:15)

Or God, holy in giving birth? (Deuteronomy 32:18)

God, beautiful in bearing the people? (Isaiah 42:14)

God, strong as a mother bear? (Hosea 13:8)

God, tender as a comforting mother? (Isaiah 66:13)

God, like a poor widow persistent in pursuit? (Luke 15:8-10)

I’m not a singer or a song-writer. I have zero musical talent. But I’m sending a call out to those with talents in this realm. Please write us a song about God, our warrior mother hen, gathering up the chicks and sheltering us, providing for us, loving us.

 

By |February 17th, 2020|Categories: Uncategorized|1 Comment

10 (or 9) Dark Things about Valentine’s Day

In going through some old essays, I found this. I wrote it for Babble and now I know why I didn’t continue writing for Babble longer than just a few years. The site was about cute memes, celebrity news, and feel-good posts. Apparently, I tend toward dark.

These stats are few years old and though I’m not sure I would say things so darkly at this point in life, I’m going to repost this. It is interesting, at least.

I also can’t count because there are really only 9 things on this list.


 

I’m all for showing love and affection. I’m just all for doing it year round and doing it in a way that doesn’t promote weight gain, child slavery, or cheating spouses. Valentine’s Day, as ruthlessly shoved down our throats by advertising and societal expectations, carries some dark stories.

I’m not anti-Valentine’s Day but I want to love my husband and my children while making wise choices, remaining loyal, eating food that actually tastes good, and not harming others in the process. And I want to do it any day of the year without feeling ordered around by a calendar or a custom.

Here are 10 (or 9) dark things about our day of love.

 

Cheating. Ashley Madison, a website that helps people find other with whom to cheat, reports that the day after Valentine’s Day, the day after being let down by their partner, the day after their expectations were raised and then crushed, is their biggest day of the year.

Origins. Some say Valentine’s Day traces its roots to an ancient pagan holiday called Lupercalia, in which men stripped naked, grabbed whips, and spanked young women in hopes of increasing their fertility.

Other Origins. Others say It began as a liturgical celebration of early Christian saints, including honoring the graphic martyrdom of some. It became associated with romance in the high middle ages.

Candy hearts are terrible. They taste like painted cardboard, leave a weird powder on your fingers, and have creepy messages.

Weight gain. Candy, chocolate, dinner out, wine. There are 1400 calories in a one-pound box of chocolates.

Break-ups. Supposedly the percentage of women who would end their relationship if they received nothing for Valentine’s Day is 53%. I must fall in the other 47%.

Money. Last year Americans spent $18.6 billion dollars for Valentine’s Day. $1.9 billion on flowers and $1.6 billion on candy. Maybe that isn’t a bad thing in your opinion, but compared to the Gross National Product of Djibouti (2011), that is a lot of money. The GNP? $1.24 billion

Waste. In the two week period leading up to Valentine’s Day, American sales of gold jewelry lead to 34 million metric tons of waste.

Chocolate and child labor. In West Africa, cocoa is a commodity crop grown primarily for export. As the chocolate industry has grown over the years, so has the demand for cheap cocoa. Today, cocoa farmers barely make a living selling the beans and often resort to the use of child labor in order to keep their prices competitive…

Flowers. In a push to meet the demands of Valentine’s Day, workers have been reported to log up to 20 hours a day, at 250-300 stems per hour. According to the Victoria International Development Education Association, two-thirds of Colombian and Ecuadorian flower workers suffer from work-related health problems, including headaches, nausea, impaired vision, conjunctivitis, rashes, asthma, stillbirths, miscarriages, congenital malformations, and respiratory and neurological problems.

Happy LOVE day!

 


 

Don’t miss a post! Sign up for Stories from the Horn, and download the prologue of Stronger than Death free.

Stronger than Death: How Annalena Tonelli Defied Terror and Tuberculosis in the Horn of Africa

Finding Home, Djiboutilicious, and Welcome to Djibouti

By |February 14th, 2020|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: |1 Comment

The Legacy of Annalena Tonelli, Carrying It On

Find Stronger than Death at Amazon,  Barnes and Noble,  and IndieBound

I love hearing how readers are moved and challenged and inspired by Stronger than Death. Some responses have even moved me to near tears.

I spoke at an English language school for adults in Djibouti. After my talk and an engaging Q/A time, students gathered in small groups to continue the discussion. One young man wrote his thoughts out and read them to the group. I asked if I could take a photo of his words and he gave me the paper. This is what he wrote:

“A good person is someone who displays love, joy, peace, kindness, goodness, humility, patience, and she was faithful, and endures all things. Annalena was someone who displays self-control and considers others more important than herself. Annalena was a good listener and someone who displayed integrity and dignity and accountability toward others.”

This was so beautiful and it was incredibly meaningful that he picked up on these character traits. The conversation around the tables included things like how hard it can be serve, when other people tell you to not bother, or how disappointing it can be when service is rejected. We talked about how we can all take one little step, like picking up one piece of trash. Or how we can sit beside someone who is sick and be a loving, caring presence, even if we don’t have money to help treat their illness. And how we can hope to motivate others by our example.

It was lovely.

*

Here is from another reader. People have asked how I think Annalena would react to having a book written about her and I hope Jodie is right:

“I finished it with the sense that Annalena would be proud – even as one who didn’t like all the attention – because you portrayed her in her humanness as well as her saintlikeness.” Jodie P.

*

Someone else told me they finished the book with tears in their eyes and with ideas for how to be more aware of students in her classroom who might need a little extra affection or attention.

*

Another person told me she would use this book to help explain some of her Somali history and culture to her American coworkers.

*

Thanks to all for your feedback, for reading, and for sharing.

Don’t forget to leave a review and be sure to share the book with your friends and family! Maybe a great Christmas gift…!

 

Find Stronger than Death at Amazon,  Barnes and Noble,  and IndieBound